Senator will ask Legislature to kill hemp bill authored by AG’s office – KETV Omaha


Senator will ask Legislature to kill hemp bill authored by AG's office - KETV Omaha

Ahead of an upcoming hearing on a hemp bill that would further define and clarify some of Nebraska’s regulations and consumer protections for the commodity, the senator who introduced it said he’ll ask the agriculture committee to stop its advance.”There are too many issues to work through” in a short session Sen. Justin Wayne told KETV NewsWatch 7 Thursday. Wayne cited several concerns buried inside the language of LB 1219.Among them:The bill would prohibit the possession of hemp for anyone under the age of 21It would require hemp farmers to give the Nebraska State Patrol at least seven days notice before transporting more than a pound of the commodityIt would outlaw the manufacture of consumable hemp products in the stateWayne said the Nebraska Attorney General’s office gave him the bill text to introduce, and he and his staff just read through the details of the proposed legislation. The Omaha senator said some of the proposals were “burdensome” for farmers and consumers. He argues there are issues that need to be clarified, especially from a consumer protection standpoint. Wayne said he would like to get regulations on the books for product labeling and testing procedures.He said he asked the AG’s office for amendments to attach before the Tuesday hearing but those have yet to cross his desk.Nebraska’s agriculture department received approval for its hemp farming regulations from the U.S. Department of Agriculture this week. The state will start taking applications to grow the crop Monday. LB 1219 would have specifically defined cannabidiol, or CBD, as a legal substance under state law. In late 2018, Attorney General Doug Peterson’s office distributed a memo to law enforcement maintaining the substance was still illegal. KETV NewsWatch 7 sent a series of questions to Peterson’s office. Among the questions was whether the attorney general has updated his interpretation of CBD.Spokesperson Suzanne Gage said she could not provide answers to meet a publication deadline. Her email made it unclear if the office would provide answers at all.

Ahead of an upcoming hearing on a hemp bill that would further define and clarify some of Nebraska’s regulations and consumer protections for the commodity, the senator who introduced it said he’ll ask the agriculture committee to stop its advance.

“There are too many issues to work through” in a short session Sen. Justin Wayne told KETV NewsWatch 7 Thursday.

Wayne cited several concerns buried inside the language of LB 1219.

Among them:

The bill would prohibit the possession of hemp for anyone under the age of 21It would require hemp farmers to give the Nebraska State Patrol at least seven days notice before transporting more than a pound of the commodityIt would outlaw the manufacture of consumable hemp products in the state

Wayne said the Nebraska Attorney General’s office gave him the bill text to introduce, and he and his staff just read through the details of the proposed legislation.

The Omaha senator said some of the proposals were “burdensome” for farmers and consumers. He argues there are issues that need to be clarified, especially from a consumer protection standpoint.

Wayne said he would like to get regulations on the books for product labeling and testing procedures.

He said he asked the AG’s office for amendments to attach before the Tuesday hearing but those have yet to cross his desk.

Nebraska’s agriculture department received approval for its hemp farming regulations from the U.S. Department of Agriculture this week. The state will start taking applications to grow the crop Monday.

LB 1219 would have specifically defined cannabidiol, or CBD, as a legal substance under state law. In late 2018, Attorney General Doug Peterson’s office distributed a memo to law enforcement maintaining the substance was still illegal.

KETV NewsWatch 7 sent a series of questions to Peterson’s office. Among the questions was whether the attorney general has updated his interpretation of CBD.

Spokesperson Suzanne Gage said she could not provide answers to meet a publication deadline. Her email made it unclear if the office would provide answers at all.


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