ATRA’s Nerthus-Sofa furniture collection uses hemp fibre and other recycled materials – Dezeen


Furniture design studio ATRA has created a modular sofa system upholstered with a hemp-based fabric.

Nerthus-Sofa collection comprises lounges, chairs and ottomans made from individual pieces that can be slotted together to create a large singular unit.

ATRA teamed up with San Francisco company MoonCloth, which focuses on producing products made from hemp, to create the collection.

Strips of white hemp fabric, a fibre produced from a strain of cannabis, wrap around the frame to form a supportive base. The plant-based textile is also used on flat square pads, attached bolsters and matching set of pillows.

ATRA chose to use hemp as the upholstery fabric because of the material’s natural qualities and production methods. According to the creators, the cloth requires 50 per cent less water to grow and produce compared to other fibres.

They added that it also doesn’t require pesticides or harmful chemicals to grow, and is free of microplastics, and absorbs more carbon dioxide produces more oxygen than other commercial crops and plants.

Yusuke Seki showcases fragile hemp textiles across banks of metal rods

Each of the pieces is framed with FSC reclaimed wood that has been locally sourced and produced using certified sustainable practices. The rectangular-shaped frames are available in either teak or mahogany wood.

ATRA and MoonCloth said the material choices are intended to make the collection more environmentally friendly in the face of the climate crisis.

“Both companies share a home in California, where the beauty of nature and the effect of climate change are visible and have inspired this collection,” ATRA said.

“In a crucial time for the environment, the Nerthus-Sofa is emblematic of how ATRA intends to adapt their business and support driving action in the luxury design community.”

Hemp has grown in popularity as designers and architects search for more sustainable materials to use in their designs. Japanese designer Yusuke Seki used the fibre to create sculptural pieces and Practice Architecture used the cannabis material in panels for a house.

ATRA’s hemp covering is available in a range of colour options, white, black, olive green, forest green, navy blue and brown.

In line with the exterior elements, the furniture’s stuffing is made with recycled or discarded objects like horsehair.

For the collection, ATRA has partnered with Cloverly, an online application service that allows customers to pay more to offset the carbon used in the production and transportation of their product.


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